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Sainsbury's Book Club

Every month, the Sainsbury's Book Club team read and recommend their favourite fiction, cookery and children's eBooks, curating a selection of free samples, book trailers, author biographies and reading group discussion points to help you get the most out of your next eBook read.

We'd love you to contribute to the Book Club too, so if you like what you read, recommend it to others by reviewing the books on the list and the best five reviews each month will win a £10 eBook voucher. Sound good? Read on...

  • Collect 50 bonus Nectar points on our lead Book Club title

    "A gripping read"

    The Girl With All The Gifts

    The Girl With All The Gifts

    by M. R. Carey

    Sharon says:

    I'm not the first and I certainly won't be the last person to claim that if I'd known what this book was about before I started it, I would never have entertained the idea of reading it. But tempted by the intriguing, sinister premise and the assurance that I would enjoy it, I began. It's different to anything else I've ever read. I'm not converted to this genre by any means but if you fancy something different, enjoy a gripping read and are happy to feel a little uncomfortable at times then do give this a go.

  • "Kept me on the edge of my seat all the way through"

    The Target

    The Target

    by David Baldacci

    Raees says:

    This is the second David Baldacci thriller that I've read after The Innocent, and it kept me on the edge of my seat from start to finish.

    Following their adventures in The Hit, Will Robie and Jessica Reel are given a top secret high risk assignment that only the US president and senior security officials are aware of. Even the vice president is kept in the dark as the failure of the mission could lead to the president's impeachment. The story develops into a full-blown international espionage, with characters that are trained to be ruthless...

    I enjoyed the fast pace of this thriller, the adrenalin rush of an impossible mission. There were several parallel story lines to keep track of and I loved the way David Baldacci managed to weave them all together for an exciting finish. The Target truly goes out with a bang.

  • "I raced through this gripping novel in a couple of days"

    Want You Dead

    Want You Dead

    by Peter James

    Richard says:

    Part psychological thriller, part police procedural, I loved this terrific and very contemporary crime novel. Told from three main viewpoints - the victim, Red Westwood, living in fear of her abusive ex, the violent psychopath who is stalking her, and Detective Superintendant Roy Grace, who is about to get married and head off on his honeymoon.

    The build up of fear and paranoia is brilliantly handled as the seemingly unstoppable stalker systematically destroys everything Red cares about before coming after her in person. I was hooked from the first page and raced through this gripping novel in a couple of days. Peter James' Roy Grace series just keeps getting better and better!

  • "An awesome comfort read for chilly autumn nights"

    It Started With Paris

    It Started With Paris

    by Cathy Kelly

    Ufuoma says:

    Reading this book felt like having a great chat with a close friend. Cathy Kelly fans will not be disappointed: it's superbly written and the characters are easy to identify with. The story starts off with a romantic proposal between Michael and Katy on the top of the Eiffel tower. Lovestruck and elated, they return home to Dublin to share the great news with their family and friends – and that's when things ​start to ​get tricky.​ ​As the couple plan the upcoming nuptial,​ there's certainly more to sort out than the wedding menu. I loved how all the characters in this story are intertwined, each person grappling with their own issues of love, family and friendship. An awesome comfort read for chilly autumn nights!

  • "Moving and very funny with black humour throughout"

    The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

    The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

    by Rachel Joyce

    Sharon says:

    Rachel Joyce wrote this book as a companion to The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry – it’s the story of Queenie Hennessy and the journey she starts as Harold Fry begins his. As keen as I was to read it, I had reservations and really didn’t want to be disappointed – how could it possibly be as good as book one? Would Rachel Joyce’s words have the same effect on me all over again? No need to worry - it’s brilliant - a gentle read, beautifully written, moving and very funny with black humour throughout mainly derived from the collection of characters in the hospice and their confused one-liners. If you haven’t read The Unlikely Pilgrimage… I’d definitely recommend that first but either way you’re in for a treat.

  • "Clever and completely unpredictable right up to the very end"

    Gone Girl

    Gone Girl

    by Gillian Flynn

    Sharon says:

    There are a handful of thrillers that I recommend passionately to people knowing without a doubt that they’ll enjoy them. On that list is The Poet by Michael Connelly, Peter James’ Dead Simple, Harlen Coben’s Tell No One and SJ Watson’s Before I Go to Sleep. Gone Girl has to be added to the list. It’s utterly gripping from the off, clever and completely unpredictable right up to the very end. You start to realise pretty early on that you can’t trust anyone or anything and nothing is quite what it seems. No surprise then that it’s been made into a film but there’s absolutely no way it can be as good as the book.

  • "Spectacular takes on everyday dishes"

    Tom Kerridge’s Best Ever Dishes

    Tom Kerridge’s Best Ever Dishes

    by Tom Kerridge

    says:

    This book contains Tom Kerridge's takes on a wide range of dishes, and as he explains in the introduction they're the result of his attempts at making every dish he cooks spectacular. None of them are simple - his recipe for corn on the cob uses 17 ingredients - but all the ones I've tried more than warrant the time and effort required.

    The introductions to the book and the individual dishes are well written and interesting, and the recipes themselves are well laid out and easy to follow. The step-by-step instructions are clear, with helpful tips along the way. They range from conventional chicken and beef dishes, to more exotic fare such as smoked eel.

    My personal favourites were the stuffed cabbage balls and sausage roast, both flavoursome and filling, while the risotto rice pudding was an interesting, creamy, and decadent twist on the classic dessert.

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