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Sainsbury's Book Club

Every month, the Sainsbury's Book Club team read and recommend their favourite fiction, cookery and children's eBooks, curating a selection of free samples, book trailers, author biographies and reading group discussion points to help you get the most out of your next eBook read.

We'd love you to contribute to the Book Club too, so if you like what you read, recommend it to others by reviewing the books on the list and the best five reviews each month will win a £10 eBook voucher. Sound good? Read on...

  • Collect 50 bonus Nectar points on our lead Book Club title

    "Made me feel I was tuning in to a TV series"

    Saints of the Shadow Bible

    Saints of the Shadow Bible

    by Ian Rankin

    Imola says:

    My last two reviews featured books about books: murderous, destructive books that could alter the course of lives and expose skeletons in the closet. This one is no different. Actually, that’s not right, this one is very different. The flow of the dialogue and the film-like descriptions made me feel I was tuning in to a TV series, and certainly not an early season. This was my first encounter with detective Rebus, shortly after he's rejoined the police (and been demoted), but that didn't stop me enjoying the book or being able to figure out what went on in his past – except for the bits he was reluctant to reveal, of course. I was not the only one nosing around, eager to uncover more: the enigmatic brotherhood he used to be part of turns out to be more than just a group of boisterous lads and a pretentious name… I especially enjoyed the dynamics between Rebus and his boss: their snarky exchanges lightened the tone in some of the grimmer situations. Go on, tune in… I promise you won't be flicking channels.

  • "The in-depth plotting kept me glued to the page "

    Be Careful What You Wish For

    Be Careful What You Wish For

    by Jeffrey Archer

    Pete says:

    This intriguing book is the fourth in the bestselling Clifton Chronicles series, following on from Best Kept Secret, and is set in the late fifties and early sixties. Jeffrey Archer is a master storyteller, and the ongoing tale of the feud between the Clifton and Barrington families swept me along. From the dramatic opening when Harry Clifton and his wife Emma rush to hospital to find out the fate of their son in a car accident, to the Barrington Shipping Company's plans to build a luxury liner, the complex story is so full of twists and turns, it takes some effort to keep up with everything that's going on. The cast of characters is excellent: I found myself enjoying the antihero Don Pedro Martinez – a real love to hate character – more than the main protagonist, Harry Clifton but all the characters are well-drawn and interesting. The in-depth plotting kept me glued to the page to see how it all turned out, and I am looking forward to going back and reading the earlier novels in the series.

  • "Heartbreaking but I just couldn’t put it down"

    Never Say Goodbye

    Never Say Goodbye

    by Susan Lewis

    Ufuoma says:

    This was my first Susan Lewis book and I honestly did not know what to expect. She describes the characters so vividly that you even start to believe you know them. The book draws you into the story of Josie and the financial struggles that her family is facing. But then Josie also has to cope with a battle of her own, which she has a hard time talking to her family about. In her loneliness she develops an unlikely friendship with Bel, a successful property developer who is haunted by a tragedy that tore her life apart. The two women couldn’t be more different except for one thing that unites them… This book made me cry and laugh at the same time. A moving story about love, friendship and family bonds.

  • "Addictive and well-researched"

    A Burnable Book

    A Burnable Book

    by Bruce Holsinger

    Imola says:

    First off, this book is not for the faint-hearted. The lust and gore is worthy of George RR Martin, with a description of medieval London so vivid you can smell it. And that smell isn't always pleasant! Holsinger transports the reader back in time to a period when political conspiracies toppled kings, and books were written on skin. It’s a world of prophecies and poetry, where your clever machinations turn out to be not so clever after all when you realise you’re the one who’s been manipulated all along, and you can't even trust your own flesh and blood.

  • "Absolutely blew me away"

    The One Plus One

    The One Plus One

    by Jojo Moyes

    Sharon says:

    Jojo Moyes is really back on form with this book. It’s so good, so funny but also really moving at times – just brilliant. You can guess from the outset where the story’s heading - it’s an unconventional love story, but not really that unconventional. For me it was about the characters – I fell in love with them all and laughed and cried with them. Jojo's previous book 'Me Before You' absolutely blew me away when I read it. This is on a par.

  • "A thriller that fascinated me until the end"

    The Way You Look Tonight

    The Way You Look Tonight

    by Richard Madeley

    Ufuoma says:

    I had seen some great reviews for​ ​Richard Madeley's previous title so I decided to give this a try. The book is a psychological thriller set in 1962. It​ opens with a murder that takes place in Florida Keys -​ that was enough to get me hooked from the start. Stella Arnold, a young English woman about to pursue her Psychology PhD in Boston,​ is invited to a BBQ in the company of the Kennedys. Dazzling her hosts with her supreme psychological abilities, ​Stella is asked to help the FBI track down a serial killer that is on the loose.​ A killer​ that is more ruthless than her own father...​

    This book fascinated me until the end. The twists are so unexpected that I couldn’t wait to find out what happens next. Every detail of the story is carefully crafted - a thriller that will linger in my thoughts for a while.

  • "This definitely has Adam Cakebread's seal of approval"

    Great British Bake Off: Big Book of Baking

    Great British Bake Off: Big Book of Baking

    by Linda Collister

    Adam Cakebread says:

    I enjoy the show and anything to do with baking, so I was always going to like this book. There is a good selection of categories that match the format of the show’s weekly competitions. My favourite (perhaps unsurprisingly, given my name) is the cake section. There is a good range of recipes, most of which cater for amateurs like me. I was happy with my attempt at the miniature chocolate & cherry cakes, which went down a treat (literally). The book in interspersed with interviews with past contestants, which, while not being of great interest to me, did give the book an atmosphere of other people joining in. 

    Overall, I liked the book and will be giving some of the other recipes a go soon. This definitely has Adam Cakebread's seal of approval - a statement that sounds more authoritative than it really is! But Cakebreads do know a good cake book when we see one!

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