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Sainsbury's Book Club

Every month, the Sainsbury's Book Club team read and recommend their favourite fiction, cookery and children's eBooks, curating a selection of free samples, book trailers, author biographies and reading group discussion points to help you get the most out of your next eBook read.

We'd love you to contribute to the Book Club too, so if you like what you read, recommend it to others by reviewing the books on the list and the best five reviews each month will win a £10 eBook voucher. Sound good? Read on...

  • Collect 50 bonus Nectar points on our lead Book Club title

    "I raced through this gripping novel in a couple of days"

    Want You Dead

    Want You Dead

    by Peter James

    Richard says:

    Part psychological thriller, part police procedural, I loved this terrific and very contemporary crime novel. Told from three main viewpoints - the victim, Red Westwood, living in fear of her abusive ex, the violent psychopath who is stalking her, and Detective Superintendant Roy Grace, who is about to get married and head off on his honeymoon.

    The build up of fear and paranoia is brilliantly handled as the seemingly unstoppable stalker systematically destroys everything Red cares about before coming after her in person. I was hooked from the first page and raced through this gripping novel in a couple of days. Peter James' Roy Grace series just keeps getting better and better!

  • "An awesome comfort read for chilly autumn nights"

    It Started With Paris

    It Started With Paris

    by Cathy Kelly

    Ufuoma says:

    Reading this book felt like having a great chat with a close friend. Cathy Kelly fans will not be disappointed: it's superbly written and the characters are easy to identify with. The story starts off with a romantic proposal between Michael and Katy on the top of the Eiffel tower. Lovestruck and elated, they return home to Dublin to share the great news with their family and friends – and that's when things ​start to ​get tricky.​ ​As the couple plan the upcoming nuptial,​ there's certainly more to sort out than the wedding menu. I loved how all the characters in this story are intertwined, each person grappling with their own issues of love, family and friendship. An awesome comfort read for chilly autumn nights!

  • "Moving and very funny with black humour throughout"

    The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

    The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

    by Rachel Joyce

    Sharon says:

    Rachel Joyce wrote this book as a companion to The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry – it’s the story of Queenie Hennessy and the journey she starts as Harold Fry begins his. As keen as I was to read it, I had reservations and really didn’t want to be disappointed – how could it possibly be as good as book one? Would Rachel Joyce’s words have the same effect on me all over again? No need to worry - it’s brilliant - a gentle read, beautifully written, moving and very funny with black humour throughout mainly derived from the collection of characters in the hospice and their confused one-liners. If you haven’t read The Unlikely Pilgrimage… I’d definitely recommend that first but either way you’re in for a treat.

  • "Clever and completely unpredictable right up to the very end"

    Gone Girl

    Gone Girl

    by Gillian Flynn

    Sharon says:

    There are a handful of thrillers that I recommend passionately to people knowing without a doubt that they’ll enjoy them. On that list is The Poet by Michael Connelly, Peter James’ Dead Simple, Harlen Coben’s Tell No One and SJ Watson’s Before I Go to Sleep. Gone Girl has to be added to the list. It’s utterly gripping from the off, clever and completely unpredictable right up to the very end. You start to realise pretty early on that you can’t trust anyone or anything and nothing is quite what it seems. No surprise then that it’s been made into a film but there’s absolutely no way it can be as good as the book.

  • "Hilariously funny and charming"

    The Rosie Effect

    The Rosie Effect

    by Graeme Simsion

    Richard says:

    I'd read The Rosie Project last year and loved it so was very much looking forward to the sequel. Now married, Don and Rosie have moved from Australia to New York but the course of true love – and life generally – does not run smoothly for our hero. Once Rosie breaks the momentous news that she and Don are going to be parents, Don's ordered life soon spirals out of control. I found myself laughing out loud (and sometimes cringing) as Don's unconventional outlook on life and love coupled with the often dangerous advice of his best friend Gene sends him spinning from one crisis to the next. Hilariously funny and charming, with a brilliantly imagined central character, this follow-up to The Rosie Project does not disappoint.

  • "Made me feel I was tuning in to a TV series"

    Saints of the Shadow Bible

    Saints of the Shadow Bible

    by Ian Rankin

    Imola says:

    My last two reviews featured books about books: murderous, destructive books that could alter the course of lives and expose skeletons in the closet. This one is no different. Actually, that’s not right, this one is very different. The flow of the dialogue and the film-like descriptions made me feel I was tuning in to a TV series, and certainly not an early season.

    This was my first encounter with detective Rebus, shortly after he's rejoined the police (and been demoted), but that didn't stop me enjoying the book or being able to figure out what went on in his past – except for the bits he was reluctant to reveal, of course. I was not the only one nosing around, eager to uncover more: the enigmatic brotherhood he used to be part of turns out to be more than just a group of boisterous lads and a pretentious name…

    I especially enjoyed the dynamics between Rebus and his boss: their snarky exchanges lightened the tone in some of the grimmer situations. Go on, tune in… I promise you won't be flicking channels.

  • "Bursting with flavour and nutrients"

    A Year in 120 Recipes

    A Year in 120 Recipes

    by Jack Monroe

    Barrie says:

    Jack Monroe's first book poignantly illustrated how she, as a single Mum with negligible income, found how to cook well for her small family on £10.00 a week. That book has brought her fame and reduced her need for such thrift but not her zeal to help others eat well on a low budget. Hence her second book "A Year in 120 Recipes" provides a loose programme for long-term budget conscious cookery. Nonetheless it is not just for the impecunious, there's plenty of excellent advice and ideas for all.

    The common thread to the majority of the recipes is that despite their economy, they're bursting with flavour and nutrients. They are well explained and illustrated, the required skill level is kept modest and preparation times reasonable - exactly what's needed for day to day meals. By dividing the year into six parts, Jack has been able to suggest seasonal ingredients that will not only be cheaper but taste better. Then, by adding recipes for preserves she extends their life. Unlike many prescriptive cook-books, Jack frequently indicates alternative or optional ingredients which allow you to vary the dishes or tailor them to your taste or simply to what happens to be in your larder at the time.

    In conclusion, this book is an immensely practical guide to daily cookery.

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