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Sainsbury's Book Club

Every month, the Sainsbury's Book Club team read and recommend their favourite fiction, cookery and children's eBooks, curating a selection of free samples, book trailers, author biographies and reading group discussion points to help you get the most out of your next eBook read.

We'd love you to contribute to the Book Club too, so if you like what you read, recommend it to others by reviewing the books on the list and the best five reviews each month will win a £10 eBook voucher. Sound good? Read on...

  • Collect 100 bonus Nectar points on our lead Book Club title

    "An awesome comfort read for chilly autumn nights"

    It Started With Paris

    It Started With Paris

    by Cathy Kelly

    Ufuoma says:

    Reading this book felt like having a great chat with a close friend. Cathy Kelly fans will not be disappointed: it's superbly written and the characters are easy to identify with. The story starts off with a romantic proposal between Michael and Katy on the top of the Eiffel tower. Lovestruck and elated, they return home to Dublin to share the great news with their family and friends – and that's when things ​start to ​get tricky.​ ​As the couple plan the upcoming nuptial,​ there's certainly more to sort out than the wedding menu. I loved how all the characters in this story are intertwined, each person grappling with their own issues of love, family and friendship. An awesome comfort read for chilly autumn nights!

  • "Moving and very funny with black humour throughout"

    The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

    The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

    by Rachel Joyce

    Sharon says:

    Rachel Joyce wrote this book as a companion to The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry – it’s the story of Queenie Hennessy and the journey she starts as Harold Fry begins his. As keen as I was to read it, I had reservations and really didn’t want to be disappointed – how could it possibly be as good as book one? Would Rachel Joyce’s words have the same effect on me all over again? No need to worry - it’s brilliant - a gentle read, beautifully written, moving and very funny with black humour throughout mainly derived from the collection of characters in the hospice and their confused one-liners. If you haven’t read The Unlikely Pilgrimage… I’d definitely recommend that first but either way you’re in for a treat.

  • "Clever and completely unpredictable right up to the very end"

    Gone Girl

    Gone Girl

    by Gillian Flynn

    Sharon says:

    There are a handful of thrillers that I recommend passionately to people knowing without a doubt that they’ll enjoy them. On that list is The Poet by Michael Connelly, Peter James’ Dead Simple, Harlen Coben’s Tell No One and SJ Watson’s Before I Go to Sleep. Gone Girl has to be added to the list. It’s utterly gripping from the off, clever and completely unpredictable right up to the very end. You start to realise pretty early on that you can’t trust anyone or anything and nothing is quite what it seems. No surprise then that it’s been made into a film but there’s absolutely no way it can be as good as the book.

  • "Hilariously funny and charming"

    The Rosie Effect

    The Rosie Effect

    by Graeme Simsion

    Richard says:

    I'd read The Rosie Project last year and loved it so was very much looking forward to the sequel. Now married, Don and Rosie have moved from Australia to New York but the course of true love – and life generally – does not run smoothly for our hero. Once Rosie breaks the momentous news that she and Don are going to be parents, Don's ordered life soon spirals out of control. I found myself laughing out loud (and sometimes cringing) as Don's unconventional outlook on life and love coupled with the often dangerous advice of his best friend Gene sends him spinning from one crisis to the next. Hilariously funny and charming, with a brilliantly imagined central character, this follow-up to The Rosie Project does not disappoint.

  • "Made me feel I was tuning in to a TV series"

    Saints of the Shadow Bible

    Saints of the Shadow Bible

    by Ian Rankin

    Imola says:

    My last two reviews featured books about books: murderous, destructive books that could alter the course of lives and expose skeletons in the closet. This one is no different. Actually, that’s not right, this one is very different. The flow of the dialogue and the film-like descriptions made me feel I was tuning in to a TV series, and certainly not an early season. This was my first encounter with detective Rebus, shortly after he's rejoined the police (and been demoted), but that didn't stop me enjoying the book or being able to figure out what went on in his past – except for the bits he was reluctant to reveal, of course. I was not the only one nosing around, eager to uncover more: the enigmatic brotherhood he used to be part of turns out to be more than just a group of boisterous lads and a pretentious name… I especially enjoyed the dynamics between Rebus and his boss: their snarky exchanges lightened the tone in some of the grimmer situations. Go on, tune in… I promise you won't be flicking channels.

  • "The in-depth plotting kept me glued to the page "

    Be Careful What You Wish For

    Be Careful What You Wish For

    by Jeffrey Archer

    Pete says:

    This intriguing book is the fourth in the bestselling Clifton Chronicles series, following on from Best Kept Secret, and is set in the late fifties and early sixties. Jeffrey Archer is a master storyteller, and the ongoing tale of the feud between the Clifton and Barrington families swept me along. From the dramatic opening when Harry Clifton and his wife Emma rush to hospital to find out the fate of their son in a car accident, to the Barrington Shipping Company's plans to build a luxury liner, the complex story is so full of twists and turns, it takes some effort to keep up with everything that's going on. The cast of characters is excellent: I found myself enjoying the antihero Don Pedro Martinez – a real love to hate character – more than the main protagonist, Harry Clifton but all the characters are well-drawn and interesting. The in-depth plotting kept me glued to the page to see how it all turned out, and I am looking forward to going back and reading the earlier novels in the series.

  • "Like a crash course dressed up as a cookbook"

    Crumb

    Crumb

    by Ruby Tandoh

    Simon says:

    I was keen to learn true cooking skills applicable to a poorly stocked cupboard and with limited kitchen appliances. This is a weighty, good looking cookbook, with instagrammed pictures throughout, accompanying detailed pastry techniques and tips-a-plenty. Each recipe demonstrates a different texture and process of working the dough: it’s like a crash course dressed up as a cookbook. I made hot water pastry savoury mini pasties (the photo below is evidence of my hard work, instagrammed to a similar standard) and I’d like to try the tea loaf next. This book is great in developing a thorough knowledge of a good range of bread and pastry textures whilst enjoying their creation far beyond just following a recipe. 

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